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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the oper
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
the table, including imposing a no-fly zone which would ground libya's air force. today the u.s. moved a destroyer and a marine amphibious task force closer to libya, and the treasury said at least $30 billion in libyan assets have been frozen. in spite of all that and with much of libya in opposition hands, qaddafi still refuses to leave, telling abc "all my people love me." we have a team of correspondents in the region. first, kelly cobiella in tripoli >> reporter: for the second time, a funeral in this eastern suburb of tripoli turned into a protest. people here claimed qaddafi's gunmen killed five of their neighbors during demonstrations last friday. what you don't see are qaddafi's security forces, as they arrived shooting their guns in the air foreign journalists were forced to leave. a cell phone camera caught this battle 125 miles from the capital in the city of misurata. qaddafi's men have been trying to retake an airfield and ammunitions depot for days and still haven't won. closer to the capital, just 30 miles to the west, anti- government protestors are holding the oil ref
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
's problems alone, but they are important to us. they're problems worth solving. >> mitchell: i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, new fears in japan. highly radioactive water is leaking from the fukushima plant and plutonium has been found in the soil. plus, she preys on child couples. cbs news tracks down a con artist making thousands in an adoption scam. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> mitchell: good evening. welcome to a special western edition of the "cbs evening news." president obama made his case for military intervention in libya tonight, telling the american people he did it to prevent a massacre in benghazi. he said once again that u.s. involvement would be limited, with coalition allies taking over command of the operation. chip reid is at the white house tonight with more on the president's speech. chip, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, russ. the president said he refused to wait for images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action in libya. >> when our interests and
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)